cow fencing

Discussion about the small Australian acres. What we can plant, animals that work and how we can farm sustainably.
keezawitch
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Fri Mar 02, 2012 6:43 pm

:? could someone tell me whatg kind of fencing is needed for cows, husband and i are having a slight disagreement.


kerry

minnie
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Location: Alice, West of Casino, NSW
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Re: cow fencing

Postby minnie » Sat Mar 03, 2012 11:11 am

Hi Kerry,

We do plain top and bottom, two strand barb in the middle and outrigger electric.

The electric stops pushing and in most instances (not all) cattle breaking through, eg. bulls especially. Mind you calves will go through anything and especially at weaning. We find with weaning mesh (chook wire) small yard works for the first week while they quieten down and remember about electric.

Hmmm now it gets more complicated, the four strand is what we do for boundry fence, but some council (I think) laws say for road frontage, fences must be five strand barb. I like the plain top and bottom for the wildlife, I don't enjoy seeing animals caught on the fence or ripped by it. :( And the five strand is only if it has to be replaced or initial fence, we've been able to fix ours and replace a strand. ;)

Internally we do two strand electric with star pickets for our small paddocks, and they'll be cut smaller over time. This works well for us, mind you our cattle are so trained to go through gates to the next paddock they tell us when it's time at the moment. ;)

Vicki

keezawitch
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Sat Mar 03, 2012 3:02 pm

thanks well i was half right i said wire, just not barbed, he said mesh. thanks again

minnie
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Re: cow fencing

Postby minnie » Sun Mar 04, 2012 7:37 am

Normally cattle will just go over mesh, ask my Mum, she's got three heifer that jump or go under 5' mesh continually.

Barb is a scourge, but for cattle it works especially with no electric. Ideally four tight strands of plain wire and electric but if like us you have cattle on the road that we don't want in, we keep the barb in the centre two.

Heidi
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Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:12 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby Heidi » Sat Mar 10, 2012 8:00 pm

Hi,
We have five strand barb on all our fences, and for the boundary, we have sheep wire attached to it (as we run a small flock of sheep also). Sheep fencing will not keep cows in.

The barb is great but not with young calves unless its in top condition with no stretch, or they will go through it easily enough, especially if spooked. However, we keep our small mob of cattle in well with it.
As we replace our fencing, I am doing top strand plain wire because my horses wreck their rugs leaning over to get the grass (which evidently must be greener) over the other side of the fence.

Goodluck
Heidi

keezawitch
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Sun Mar 11, 2012 10:50 am

my dad wants me to get a milking cow to go with the goats, but i dont think so.We have been told we can use the other 2acres attached to our 3 for stock if we want to fix and replace the fences and thats where i would put a cow but i really dont think it will happen, we are somewhat short on the folding stuff, had a rotten yr, but i will keep this in mind for when we get back on our feet, there are a few people on a cheeseforum I have been on that have mentioned sharing a cow so maybe that is something to look at.

kerry

minnie
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Re: cow fencing

Postby minnie » Tue Mar 13, 2012 7:39 am

Hi Kerry,

Honestly I tell people on small acres with the go sheep and goats (for milking) instead of a house cow. A cow is a herd animal and for milk you need a calf, then how do you get it into calf again, local bull or AI... so many people get a cow and find they can't cope, stick with the sheep and goats (milk a goat, for cheese, it's great cheese) and hunt around for someone with cows to either share or a dairy that you can access milk from.

I know when I get to selling ours as house cows, I won't sell to anyone on small acres with lots of stock who haven't had cattle before, because I'd just have to buy them back eventually and it's happening to quite a few people.

Vicki

keezawitch
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Tue Mar 13, 2012 12:05 pm

yeh Vicki, I really do agree with you the goats are easy care and on small acrage if we dry up and dont have a lot of grass they are a lot more economical to suppliment, also the calving thing would be a real pain, dont need a bull on small acres at least here we can fit a few nannies with a buck and still have room for husbands ram and sheep. Great idea about sourcing a dairy there was one not far from here but i dont know if it is still in operation, they have sold a lot of the land for housing development, must try to take a run out and ask. I would like to try 50/50 cow and goat just to see how it went, i have done that with my homemade yogurt and I HAVE HIT ON A WINNER, the full goat milk wasnt thick enough for me but adding the cow milk has thickened it up nicely.

minnie
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Re: cow fencing

Postby minnie » Wed Mar 14, 2012 7:50 am

Hi Kerry,

Just remember when you approach a dairy, that legally in this country they aren't allowed to 'sell' milk... maybe they'd like a donation or swap or something.

It's handy to know because they can't afford to lose their livelyhood for a person getting a few litres here and there.

;)
Vicki

keezawitch
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Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Wed Mar 14, 2012 2:43 pm

thanks for that, i didnt know, that explains why you dont see fresh milk/cram signs up anymore, when we were little we used to call into dairies and get lovely fresh cream, why did they do this? Make it illegal I mean.

Kerry

minnie
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Re: cow fencing

Postby minnie » Fri Mar 16, 2012 8:36 am

Well usually it's all about control and money!

Also because it's raw milk, even though we eradicated (mind you it's watched all the time) TB from Australia and many many people advocate the drinking of raw (unpastuerised) milk.

It certainly makes better cheese in my opinion. ;)

Vicki

keezawitch
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Fri Mar 16, 2012 6:48 pm

I dont have any problem with raw milk I dont pasturise mine unless I plan to keep it in fridge for a few days. I like to use the raw milk in cheese and yogurt and it is a must for quark, If I pasturise it for quark it just doesnt thicken or curdle. I quess these laws are essential to safe guard the public because not everyone adheres to the high standard of cleanliness that most of us have.

kerry

minnie
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Re: cow fencing

Postby minnie » Sat Mar 17, 2012 9:11 am

We found keeping the milk in glass bottles rather than plastic the raw milk lasted longer. We only got milk once per week (approx 6-7 litres), DH is a big milk drinking... I think it's because he's an ex milko. ;)

Vicki

keezawitch
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Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Sat Mar 17, 2012 7:40 pm

Yes definately glass bottles, they can be sterilised and reused, the plastic is can harbour bacteria and it is near impossible to sterilise.

kerry

minnie
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Location: Alice, West of Casino, NSW
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Re: cow fencing

Postby minnie » Sun Mar 18, 2012 10:16 am

The plastic ones, with the top bit cut off make a good pot for propagation though. ;)

Vicki

keezawitch
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Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Sun Mar 18, 2012 1:05 pm

yep, so do those plastic trays you get your meat in, that is for us poor souls who still have to buy their meat :lol:

kerry

minnie
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Joined: Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:23 am
Location: Alice, West of Casino, NSW
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Re: cow fencing

Postby minnie » Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:50 am

I had to think about the trays, it's been a while. ;)

I kept lots of polystyrene trays which a really handy for putting something on say, lasagna or sausage rolls for the freezer.

Vicki

keezawitch
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 8:04 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby keezawitch » Tue Mar 20, 2012 6:13 am

yes they are, i tend to keep all that stuff,they come in handy for so many things, great puppy food bowls, I even used these funny looking trays that got meatballs in, they had individual cup shapes for each meatball, put holes in them and used as cheese moulds for my gbjnet(maltese) cheese, worked great.

kerry :D

Heidi
Posts: 582
Joined: Sun Aug 16, 2009 10:12 pm

Re: cow fencing

Postby Heidi » Wed Mar 21, 2012 10:15 pm

now that's a recipe I need...my father is maltese and I'd love to take some to him!
H


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